popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale
popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale_top
popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale__after

Description

Product Description

This book provides evidence-based answers to the key questions asked by marketers every day. Tackling issues such as how brands grow, how advertising really works, what price promotions really do and how loyalty programs really affect loyalty, How Brands Grow presents decades of research in a
style that is written for marketing professionals to grow their brands. It is the first book to present these laws in context and to explore their meaning and application.

The most distinctive element to this book is that the laws presented are tried and tested; they have been found to hold over varied conditions, time and countries. This is contrary to most marketing texts and indeed, much information provides evidence that much modern marketing theory is far from
soundly based.

Review


" How Brands Grow is a wonderful stimulant, a fascinating corrective to our tendency to follow fashion and let received wisdom go unchallenged." MarketingWeek


"Highly practical includes many groundbreaking ideas." CHOICE


"Marketers need to move beyond the psycho-babble and read this book or be left hopelessly behind."Joseph Tripodi, The Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta USA


"Until every marketer applies these learnings, there will be a competitive advantage for those who do."Mitch Barnes, The Nielsen Company


"A scientific journey that reveals and explains with great rigour the Laws of Growth."Bruce McColl, Mars Incorporated


"This book puts marketing''s myth-makers, of which there are many, in their proper place."Thomas Bayne, MountainView Learning, London.


"A truly thought-provoking book."Timothy Keiningham, IPSOS Loyalty


"The evidence in this book should make any marketer think hard about how they manage their brands."Kevin Brennan, General Manager Snacks and Marketing Director, Kellogg UK


"This book should be required reading on any marketing course."Colin McDonald, the ''father'' of Single-Source analysis and author of Tracking Advertising & Monitoring Brands


"There is competitive advantage here for those who understand and follow this book''s lessons."Jack Wakshlag, Chief Research Officer, Turner Broadcasting Systems, Inc.


About the Author


Professor Byron Sharp is the Director of the Ehrenberg-Bass Institute for Marketing Science at the University of South Australia. The Institute''s fundamental research is used and financially supported by many of the world''s leading corporations including Coca-Cola, Kraft, Kellogg''s, British Airways,
Procter & Gamble, Nielsen, TNS, Turner Broadcasting, Network Ten, Simplot, Mars and many others. Dr Sharp has published over 100 academic papers and is on the editorial board of five journals. He recently co-hosted a conference at the Wharton Business School on laws of advertising and, with
Professor Jerry Wind, is editing a special issue of the Journal of Advertising Research on the topic.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Related posts

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
363 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Ashar
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A must read, whether you agree or disagree with it
Reviewed in the United States on June 17, 2017
I was skeptical of this book, and put off reading for sometime. My reason was that although acquisition and penetration seems to be at the core of the message, as big brands having a slight edge on retention than smaller ones (I saw some youtube''s by professor Sharp), the... See more
I was skeptical of this book, and put off reading for sometime. My reason was that although acquisition and penetration seems to be at the core of the message, as big brands having a slight edge on retention than smaller ones (I saw some youtube''s by professor Sharp), the book is not available in Kindle. Anybody writing a book and really wanting to acquire bunch of new audience probably shouldn''t say no to a channel that controls 70-80% of the e-reader market. I tweeted to prof Sharp and he had his reasons, mostly centered around the formatting of the book being harder on Kindle, which might be the case ( Although I believe Amazon is way too advanced for not formatting charts and tables correctly, and I have self published my daughters poems, it was very easy).
Moving on beyond why I didn''t read the book early on. I think this book is absolutely fantastic read. It is written in a matter of fact way, with data points for every argument it makes. It was recommended by Dr. Fader (Wharton School) , after I asked him a certain question, and I had to change my mind and actually read it. He was spot on. Lot of the findings in the book are very close to what I have seen in practical data. If you are in midst of digital advertising revolution and working on a relatively smaller brand this book will clear your head on some misconceptions or lets say popular notions of brand building and may give you new ideas on how to go about it. I rather not summarize the book in my review, but I think the book gives the reader different ideas on the few questions such as retention vs acquisition, understanding the relation ship of cross selling to customer base, how much to sweat on retention and defection, focusing and trying to acquire a certain customer segment relative to brand size.

In short, I would say whether you agree with the book or not, it is a must read.
17 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
A4Q96
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Seminal book
Reviewed in the United States on November 18, 2019
Seminal book. How brands grow is a fantastic read on an objective view of what drives growth. I have seen several examples of evidence based marketing and growth, out of following the guidance provided. A must read for any marketer and market researchHow brands... See more
Seminal book. How brands grow is a fantastic read on an objective view of what drives growth. I have seen several examples of evidence based marketing and growth, out of following the guidance provided.

A must read for any marketer and market researchHow brands grow is a fantastic read on an objective view of what drives growth. I have seen several examples of evidence based marketing and growth, out of following the guidance provided.

A must read for any marketer and market researcher.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Himmat C.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Every competitive businessperson should read this, but I hope my competitors don''t
Reviewed in the United States on February 21, 2021
Pro''s:
- Actionable
- Convincingly answers the most important questions re: Brands, Marketing, and Brand Growth/Death

Con''s:
- A little repetitive, but that''s a small price to pay for actionable info.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Where''s the beef? In the last two chapters
Reviewed in the United States on February 1, 2018
4 stars because the book takes a while setting up its major points. If you could just buy the last two chapters, that would be worth it. Also, the narration on the audio book is super robotic.
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Nate
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Misguided marketing principles.
Reviewed in the United States on February 8, 2020
Book makes no sense.
Helpful
Report
Woofie Jo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thought-Provoking Book!
Reviewed in the United States on April 1, 2017
Amazing book that will challenge everything you know about effective marketing and market research and get you to rethink some tried and true principles.
Helpful
Report
Sambu Family
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book. Proof and disprove most marketing principles by ...
Reviewed in the United States on July 9, 2014
Great book. Proof and disprove most marketing principles by looking at sales data across many categories. The Marketing discipline needs more books and studies with this kind of rigor.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Vid Al
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on March 21, 2018
Exactly what I needed. Price was right. Delivered quickly.
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

NYLON. 509 964 940
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Will turn your brand into a commodity
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 1, 2020
Before reading books I always look at the experience of the person writing it. The author worked only in Australia and New Zealand. Also he only worked as a marketer for 2 years at a tech recruitment company which failed. So with all the hype around the book, I was already...See more
Before reading books I always look at the experience of the person writing it. The author worked only in Australia and New Zealand. Also he only worked as a marketer for 2 years at a tech recruitment company which failed. So with all the hype around the book, I was already skeptical. This is regurgitated information from the past that worked in a different world but no long works to build a brand and create long-term incremental sales, only short-term sales that will need your investment over and over with no long term benefits a true brand will give you. If it was called how sales grow, it would make more sense but has little to do with what actually works in creating iconic brands.
6 people found this helpful
Report
Jack London
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A braeth fo fresh air
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 24, 2017
A refreshing take on marketing myths, using research the author identifies some marketing shibboleths and corrects them and posts some suggested axioms (or laws) based on cited research which will be familiar to savvy marketers (eg. Ehrenberg et al.) which should free...See more
A refreshing take on marketing myths, using research the author identifies some marketing shibboleths and corrects them and posts some suggested axioms (or laws) based on cited research which will be familiar to savvy marketers (eg. Ehrenberg et al.) which should free marketers from an obsession for short-term results and focus on grounded methods to achieve brand growth. Definitely worth reading.
4 people found this helpful
Report
Jo
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
FMCG Brand Book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 23, 2018
This was an interesting read and provides some very valuable information but it''s targeted at product marketing. If you are working in B2B services then I wouldn''t recommend this book. It is a shame as Bryon Sharp is a great writer and is hugely knowledgeable and...See more
This was an interesting read and provides some very valuable information but it''s targeted at product marketing. If you are working in B2B services then I wouldn''t recommend this book. It is a shame as Bryon Sharp is a great writer and is hugely knowledgeable and influential in the world of marketing so it would be great to get his insights on building brands in service marketing, where there are no products!
5 people found this helpful
Report
Ms J M Booth
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sharp argues that the Double jeopardy law tells us what our marketing metrics will look like – if we are successful in gaining s
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 20, 2015
How brands grow is a book largely about fundamental marketing principles: brand growth, how advertising works, price promotions and loyalty programs. It’s a myth-busting classic, filled with scientific discovery so it feels different from the more traditional business...See more
How brands grow is a book largely about fundamental marketing principles: brand growth, how advertising works, price promotions and loyalty programs. It’s a myth-busting classic, filled with scientific discovery so it feels different from the more traditional business textbooks. Sharp successfully tears strips off current marketing practices and likens marketing managers to “medieval doctors, working on impressions and myth.” He pushes this analogy further when he compares much of our modern marketing theory to the practice of bloodletting, which was once regarded as a particularly effective way to “cure” medical ailments. You get the feeling that Sharp really enjoys challenging every single marketing assumption we all have; from the taken as given need to differentiate your brand to the fact that a brand’s consumers are a distinctive type of person, in fact, even the pareto law gets a kicking, gone are the assurances that 80% of sales come from the top 20% of your buyers – according to Byron only slightly more than half of sales come from the top 20% of the brand’s customers, the rest come from the bottom 80% . It’s true to say that by and large this book is somewhat of a manifesto for what he calls his new world model: Past World Model Positioning Differentiation Message Comprehension Unique Selling Proposition Persuasion Teaching Rational Involved Viewers New World Model Salience Distinctiveness Getting noticed,emotional response Relevant Associations Refreshing and building memory structures Reaching Emotional DistractedViews And this new world model rests on a very simple premise that ALL brands grow by increasing their market penetration, forget about loyalty and/or anything else. He proves this hypothesis through what he calls the Double Jeopardy Law. Sharp argues that the Double jeopardy law tells us what our marketing metrics will look like – if we are successful in gaining sales and market share. Here’s an example: Shampoo Brands Market Share (%) Annual market Penetration (%) Purchase Frequency (average) Suave Naturals 12 19 2.0 Pantene Pro V 10 16 1.9 Alberto VO5 6 11 1.6 Garnier Fructis 5 9 1.7 Dove 4 8 1.4 Finesse 1 2 1.4 Average 1.7 Note: Smaller US shampoo brands suffer from only slightly lower loyalty. If Finesse were to catapult up to the sales levels of Suave Naturals or Pantene Pro V, it would be substantially more popular with millions more households buying it each year. But these households would not, on average buy it much more often than current Finesse households buy the brand. Finesse’s brand manager could plan to reach market leadership by getting current customers to buy eight times a year. That would be enough to do it – in theory. But in practice it’s impossible. As Sharp goes on to point out Finesse buying households currently only buy shampoo six times a year; therefore Finesse would need to command 100% loyalty just to achieve six purchases per year per customer. But no shampoo brand in the US commands 100% loyalty. Such a marketing plan is a fantasy. Double jeopardy, therefore, tells us what is, and what isn’t achievable – sort of a practical guide to strategy formulation. Make your brand famous,make your brand popular. The book continually delivers a strong case for mass marketing, as attested above, Sharp continually hammers home that growth in market share comes by increasing your brand popularity or fame. You do this by gaining many more buyers (of all types), most of whom are light consumers buying the brand occasionally. This allows Sharp to controversially define brands as “undifferentiated choice options of varying popularity.” It’s an easy read, a lot of it planners probably already know as it’s based on the work of Andrew Ehrenberg who in 2003 proved, albeit with shorter term dynamic analysis, that both rising and declining brands displayed more change in their penetration than in their purchase frequency. Sharp adds a level of metric data to the debate which makes Ehrenberg’s theories easier to substantiate. This argument also fits well with the more recent IPA analysis by Binet & Field in 2007 which showed that effectiveness award winners were far more likely to have set targets to increase market penetration.
4 people found this helpful
Report
Felixport
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Highly recommended reading for anyone involved in business or brand promotion
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 27, 2016
Finally, a book on marketing and advertising which gives simple but profound advice. It says things which I''ve often thought about marketing but which I have never actually seen in print before. Moreover, the authors back up much of their claims with reference to empirical...See more
Finally, a book on marketing and advertising which gives simple but profound advice. It says things which I''ve often thought about marketing but which I have never actually seen in print before. Moreover, the authors back up much of their claims with reference to empirical studies. I''ve finished this book and it has changed the way I think about this whole area. Highly recommended reading for anyone involved in business or brand promotion.
4 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Explore similar books

Tags that will help you discover similar books. 7 tags
Results for: 
Where do clickable book tags come from?
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • about harley davidson
  • brand management
  • brand marketing
  • public economics
  • public finance
  • sales management

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale

popular How sale Brands Grow: What online Marketers Don't Know online sale