popular Duck, popular Duck, Goose: The Ultimate Guide to Cooking Waterfowl, outlet sale Both Farmed and Wild online

popular Duck, popular Duck, Goose: The Ultimate Guide to Cooking Waterfowl, outlet sale Both Farmed and Wild online

popular Duck, popular Duck, Goose: The Ultimate Guide to Cooking Waterfowl, outlet sale Both Farmed and Wild online
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Product Description

A lush, illustrated cookbook devoted to preparing and cooking ducks and geese, both domestic and wild, from the author of the award-winning blog Hunter Angler Gardener Cook.
 
Duck is having a renaissance in American restaurants and kitchens as cooks discover that diverse breeds, species, and cuts of meat offer an exciting range of flavors and textures. Many cooks—and even hunters—have a fear of cooking fowl. Duck, Duck, Goose shows you how to cook duck and goose like a pro: perfectly crisp skin crackling with each bite, succulent confit, impeccable prosciutto, and more.

Hank Shaw, an award-winning food writer, hunter, and cook on the forefront of the marsh-to-table revolution, provides all you need to know about obtaining, cleaning, and cooking these flavorful birds. Duck, Duck, Goose includes detailed guides on species and breeds, selecting a duck in the market, and plucking and hanging a wild bird. Shaw’s delicious and doable recipes include basics such as Grilled Duck Breast and Slow-Roasted Duck; international favorites like Duck Pho, Sichuan Fragrant Duck, Mexican Duck with Green Mole, and Cassoulet; and celebration-worthy fare such as Perfect Roast Goose. It also features an array of duck and goose confit and charcuterie, from fresh sausages to dry-cured salami.
 
The most comprehensive guide to preparing and cooking both domestic and wild ducks and geese, Duck, Duck, Goose will be a treasured companion for anyone who wants to free themselves from the tyranny of chicken and enjoy perfectly cooked waterfowl.

Amazon.com Review

Featured Recipes from Duck, Duck, Goose

Review

“A Best Cookbook of 2013”—Sunset

“Hank Shaw elevates waterfowl to its rightful place in the culinary skies. He will teach you how to turn flesh into edible works of art without sacrificing practicality. I’ll be reading—and using—this book for decades to come.”
—Steven Rinella, author of  American Buffalo and Meat Eater

“You don’t have to be a hunter to want to cook duck and goose. Thankfully, Hank Shaw has demystified these birds for all to enjoy!”
—Chris Cosentino, chef-owner of Incanto and winner of Top Chef Masters

“Throughout history in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, the tasty, sustainable, and versatile duck has satisfied many happy diners. Whether you want to know the difference in taste between certain species or even how to make a duck hot dog, Hank’s book is a perfectly thorough guide on everything you need to know about preparing duck.” 
—Daniel Boulud, chef, restaurateur, and author of  Braise

“Hank Shaw has produced a kind of ‘ultimate cookbook,’ which I found utterly fascinating. Here is everything you will ever need to know about ducks and geese, how to hunt them in the supermarket or in the marsh, and how to cook them.”
 —Paula Wolfert, author of  The Cooking of Southwest France and  Mediterranean Cooking

“In my universe there is no bigger star than Hank Shaw. Passionate and learned, his writing provides the inspiration for those who don’t live the outdoors lifestyle to be in the field and on the water. His recipes teach even the most expert cook how to use the right techniques for handling waterfowl in the kitchen and his wit and wisdom make Duck, Duck, Goose a superb read. With Holly Heyser’s beautiful and practical imagery, this book delivers on its promise to make us all more competent cooks.”
—Andrew Zimmern, host of Bizarre Foods and Andrew Zimmern’s Bizarre World

“I grew up among avid duck hunters and have enjoyed many meals  of teal, mallards, and other wild ducks, and as a chef I’ve worked with every kind of domesticated duck. It’s no secret that duck is one of my favorite things to cook. I love that this book exists! I hope it will inspire many more cooks to explore the wonderful flavor of wild and domesticated ducks.”
—Traci des Jardins, James Beard Award-winning chef and owner of Jardinière

If your acquaintance with water fowl is limited to Peking duck and Christmas goose, then, welcome, because you''re holding an invitation to a remarkable world of cooking. Hank Shaw''s recipes, along with his inimitable prose, lure you into the kitchen, encouraging you to cook everything from whole birds to giblets; dishes smoked and drunken; Chinese, French, Laotian, and German; crispy and braised. Shaw''s passion is so infectious, his knowledge so commanding, Duck, Duck, Goose is more than a cookbook. It''s a culinary field guide to dishes delightfully exotic to comfortingly familiar.
—David Leite, author of The New Portuguese Table and publisher of Leite''s Culinaria (LCcooks.com)

About the Author

HANK SHAW is the author of the book  Hunt, Gather, Cook and the blog  Hunter Angler Gardener Cook, which won the James Beard Award for Best Blog in 2013 and the IACP Best Food Blog award in both 2010 and 2011. Shaw has been featured on the Travel Channel’s  Bizarre Foods and his work has appeared in  Food & Wine, Organic Gardening, Field & Stream, and the  Art of Eating, as well as hunting and conservation magazines such as  Delta Waterfowl, California Waterfowl Magazine, and  Pheasants Forever. He lives in the Sacramento, California area. Learn more at www.honest-food.net.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

INTRODUCTION
 
Cooking a duck or a goose in today’s world is an act of expression. It  is a way to find that forgotten feast we Americans once enjoyed, to free ourselves from the Tyranny of the Chicken and shake our fists at the notion that fat is our enemy. Mastering these birds will make you a more competent carnivore. It will help you regain the skills we once had in our kitchens, and it will give you the knowledge needed to tackle more challenging morsels, such as giblets and wings and rendered fat. Cooking a duck or goose—a whole bird, from bill to feet—is real cooking. True, honest cooking.

Like pork, these birds offer an array of flavors and textures depending on which cut you choose. But unlike almost every other animal we normally consider food, ducks and geese offer a diversity of breeds and species that even a novice can detect at the table. The flavor of a Pekin duck is as far from that of a goose as a skinless chicken breast is from a rib eye. And that is just a domestic example. Throw in the world of wild ducks and geese and your experiences multiply tenfold: a roasted green-winged teal bears little resemblance to an eider, a goose, or even a cinnamon teal. The common mallard can taste markedly different depending on whether it had been eating corn, acorns, rice, or fish.

Waterfowl has a rich human history, as well. Tamed first by the ancient Egyptians, geese are one of humankind’s oldest domesticated animals. Ducks, which arrived in the barnyard later, have nevertheless been domesticated for thousands of years and arose independently in two parts of the world before they spread to the rest of the globe. Cultures as far-flung as Mexico, Persia, and China have been cooking ducks and geese for more than three millennia, and nearly every cuisine in the world has found a place for duck at the table.

Perfectly cooked duck breast has the meatiness of a steak with an additional cloak of fatty, crispy skin. In fact, it is better to associate duck with beef than with other poultry: think of the breast meat as a steak and the rest of the bird as the brisket. But it is the skin that most distinguishes duck in the kitchen. Crispy duck skin is one of the greatest pleasures of the dining table. It is the reason that Peking duck has persisted as a Chinese classic for nearly seven hundred years. And crispy skin is what separates confit, a French method of lightly curing duck legs or wings and then slowly cooking them in their own fat, from any another piece of braised meat. Confit is so meaty, silky, and crispy that it has become many a chef’s “death bed” meal.

I am not alone in feeling this passionate about waterfowl. Duck is experiencing a renaissance in restaurant kitchens across the continent. Seared duck breast or duck confit has become a common sight on menus. And just as with the pork revolution of the past decade, diners well outside of the nation’s culinary capitals of San Francisco, New York, and Chicago are finding evidence of the trend: crispy duck tongues  in Kansas City; duck skin cracklins in Toronto; duck consommé in Minneapolis; foie gras foam in Sacramento; duck legs, braised and pulled like carnitas, tucked into tacos in Austin. Diners are excited about duck. It has become the new pork.

But this renaissance need not be the province of the professionals. Restaurant cooks are not wizards. With the possible exception of Peking duck, they are not cooking duck in mystical ways that require years of apprenticeship to master. Cooking a duck properly is not rocket science, though it does require some specialized knowledge. This book’s primary goal is  to give you that knowledge.

I can hear some of you. You’re thinking about the ducks you’ve eaten in the past, and the image you’ve conjured up is not good. Chances are the first word that popped into your head was some variant of greasy, dry, or livery. And I am certain that either you or someone you know has his or her Great Goose Disaster story. These tales of woe typically begin with visions of a Victorian Christmas and end with gallons of grease—often igniting into fireballs—dry, unhappy meat, and  a lifetime of disappointment. “Oh, I tried goose once. Let me tell you about the time . . .” Even hunters who often shoot scores of ducks in a season share this fear of fowl and banish their ducks to the sausage heap.

This need not be so. With a few exceptions, the recipes in this book can be done with no special equipment from ingredients you can buy in an average supermarket. Yes, I have included a few high-wire recipes, but that is just to show you the range of dishes you can create with these remarkable animals.

In the pages that follow, you will learn how to break down a duck or goose into legs, breasts, and wings, a process not terribly different from how you handle a chicken. The hunters among you will find out how to hang, pluck, and eviscerate their birds. Throughout this book, you will discover the fundamentals of duck and goose cookery: how to cook a duck breast properly, and how to cook duck legs so that they are tender, yet still have crispy skin. I will walk you through the culinary jazz of making sausages and other charcuterie and stocks, teach you how to render duck and goose fat from both domestic and wild birds, and describe how to cook with that fat as well as with duck eggs, which may look like chicken eggs but are not.

Once you learn my method for braising duck legs, you can use it to cook not only my other braised waterfowl recipes but also to perfect your own creations. Master the task of searing a duck breast medium-rare with crispy skin and you will never be far from a memorable meal: even paired with a store-bought sauce and tater tots, a perfectly cooked duck breast never fails to impress. And after you make a few batches of sausage using my techniques, you will find yourself making links in your own personal style. Charcuterie is an addictive culinary art.

Of special importance to me is the section on  giblets. Properly cooked, giblets can taste every bit as wondrous as the rest of the duck. But there is the rub: for many, “properly cooked” is an impossibility.  The recipes in this book will disabuse you of that idea, and they will help you make full use of a duck’s so-called fifth quarter, even if is only in gravy, sausage, or a homemade “duck burger.”

But before you can cook, you must first catch your duck, be it in the market or the marsh. Thankfully, this is no longer the ordeal it once was. Ten years ago, you would be lucky to find a frozen whole duck in your supermarket. Now those same markets are starting to sell breasts and legs separately and stock fresh whole ducks at the meat counter. Farmers’ markets are increasingly offering carefully raised heritage breeds, and duck eggs are no longer a rare item. What’s more, if you have an Asian market near you, you will never want for duck: Asians eat the majority of all ducks raised worldwide, and for many Chinese and Southeast Asians, duck is more common than chicken.

It is my hope that if you glean nothing else from this book, you will come away with a heaping slice  of confidence in the kitchen. Waterfowl are endlessly fascinating, endlessly diverse in their forms and flavors. Get yourself some duck breasts, with a nice layer of fat and skin. Sear them in a pan until the skin crisps like a cracker and the meat is as lovely as a medium-rare rib eye. Flavor it with nothing more than sea salt, pepper, and perhaps a squeeze of lemon. Taste it. Savor it. You will see. A perfect duck breast is a revelation, a life-changing event. There will be no turning back. Ready to begin?
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Slow-Roasted Duck
 
Difficulty: *
Serves 2 to 4, depending on the duck
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes  to 1 hour
 
This is an easier way to roast a duck that does not involve cutting off the breast midstream. It is a European method that results in a thoroughly cooked bird with no pink breast meat. You start the duck in a low oven and finish on high to crisp the skin. This method works with domesticated ducks and very fatty wild ones.
 
1 domesticated duck, or 2 very fat wild ducks
1 lemon, halved
1 tablespoon kosher salt
4 sprigs sage, rosemary, flat-leaf parsley,  or thyme, or a mixture
 
Preheat the oven to 300°F. To ensure crisp skin, pierce the skin all over with a clean needle or the tip of a sharp knife, positioning the tool at an angle so that you are piercing just the skin and not the meat. Another option that works very well comes from chef Eddy Leroux of Restaurant Daniel in New York City: score the skin of the whole duck with a sharp knife in the same sort of crosshatch pattern you would use if you were cooking just the breast. Leroux’s method looks odd but results in a crispier skin. Whichever you choose, opening up the skin helps render the fat underneath, making it crispier.

Rub the duck all over with the cut sides of the lemon. Use both halves to coat it thoroughly. Put the spent halves inside the cavity. Liberally salt the bird; use a little more salt than you think you need. Stuff the cavity with the herbs.
Put the duck in a cast-iron frying pan or other heavy, ovenproof pan and roast for 45 minutes. If you are roasting small wild ducks (wigeon, teal, wood duck, or the like), roast for 30 minutes. Check the fat accumulating in the pan and pour some off as you go. Save this fat to cook with later.

Remove the pan from the oven and turn the heat up to 500°F. When it reaches this temperature, roast for 5 to  15 minutes longer. Small birds such as teal or wigeon will need only 5 minutes, and large birds such as Muscovy or Rouen will need the full 15 minutes; a mallard will need 10 minutes.

Remove from the oven and let the bird rest before carving or serving. You’ll only need 5 minutes resting time for small birds, 10 minutes for other ducks. Carve as directed on page 32.
 
 
 
A Word on Salt
All salts are not alike. For this book, I use Morton’s kosher salt, the kind that comes in the big blue box. The other common household brand, Diamond Crystal, is ground finer than Morton’s. This means that if you are a Diamond Crystal user, you will need less salt than what I call for in my recipes. This is why in my salami, baking, and curing recipes, I also provide salt (and curing salt) measures by weight in addition to volume.

I prefer to use bulk sea salt in my kitchen—I make my own from the Pacific Ocean—and I also use a variety of finishing salts, such as French fleur de sel, sel gris, flaked salt, and smoked salt. The best place to get your hands on quality salts is The Meadow, which has shops in Portland, Oregon, and in New York City. They sell online at www.atthemeadow.com.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
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Brian Brenton
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best wild duck cookbook available
Reviewed in the United States on October 2, 2013
I won''t pretend to have an opinion on how this book compares to others focused on domestic waterfowl, as any ducks or geese that pass through my kitchen do so by way of a shotgun. From a hunter''s perspective, it is the best waterfowl cookbook that I have ever seen, and my... See more
I won''t pretend to have an opinion on how this book compares to others focused on domestic waterfowl, as any ducks or geese that pass through my kitchen do so by way of a shotgun. From a hunter''s perspective, it is the best waterfowl cookbook that I have ever seen, and my kitchen is full of them. Anything else is a distant second. This is going to immediately replace the time-tested LL Bean Fish and Game Cookbook as my go-to reference for ducks and geese. The instructions are exceptionally clear and the photography is fantastic. The author does a great job delineating which species of bird is best for each recipe, which should be very helpful for beginning hunters or anyone who is lucky enough to be be gifted a couple of wild ducks from a friend who hunts.

There are a lot of interesting recipes that cover the use of duck and goose breasts, the most common element available to those who don''t pluck their birds in the round. Better yet, there are very specific instructions on the best way to process whole birds including plucking, eviscerating, breaking down, and freezing. These instructions and the accompanying photos are worth the price of the book without a single recipe.

The book contains a solid mix of traditional waterfowl recipes as well as Asian preparations that I cannot wait to try once duck season opens. Having spent many years smoking whole birds and making jerky, I can assure any prospective readers that the recipes for both of these methods are spot on and will result in a stellar end product.

I highly recommend this book to any and all wild fowl hunters and for anyone else interested in alternative methods for cooking and preserving any sort of waterfowl. It is not often that you run across a book that makes an equally great gift for both your NRA life member father-in-law and locovore hipster cousin, but the author delivers on both counts.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fabulous find on how to prepare waterfowl!!
Reviewed in the United States on December 1, 2017
My son has taken up hunting, and has friends who hunt. I needed to find some quality recipes to properly cook the duck and geese he brings home. I fondly remember the taste of roast goose from ones received by my grandfather when I was a child, but have a husband who says... See more
My son has taken up hunting, and has friends who hunt. I needed to find some quality recipes to properly cook the duck and geese he brings home. I fondly remember the taste of roast goose from ones received by my grandfather when I was a child, but have a husband who says he "hates" duck. This book is amazing with the information that it contains as far as the variety of waterfowl and their differences. I love the different chapters on properly preparing the various parts of the bird, as well as the suggestions as to which type of waterfowl is best suited for the individual recipe. the suggestions on wine and beer pairings are also unique and helpful. I have recommended this to anyone I know who is/lives with/knows a hunter.
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Celestial Abyss
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Simply ducky...
Reviewed in the United States on March 2, 2014
Around fifteen years ago, a co-worker and hunter gave me a wild duck breast from one of his expeditions. It was deep maroon, and looked awesome. I proceeded to take it home and ruin it -- by cooking it like one would cook chicken. it ended up dried out and inedible.... See more
Around fifteen years ago, a co-worker and hunter gave me a wild duck breast from one of his expeditions. It was deep maroon, and looked awesome. I proceeded to take it home and ruin it -- by cooking it like one would cook chicken. it ended up dried out and inedible.

If you read this book, you''d never make THAT mistake. Wild duck and supermarket duck are not remotely the same; and even among wild ducks, there is a variety of approaches to the meals that one needs to take into account -- likely diet of the bird just before being shot, species, age... and the author explains why. He provides recipes and tricks for all manner of duck.

I now get my duck from a local farmer -- definitely better quality than supermarket duck -- and many of the recipes in this book prove useful for my needs and culinary explorations.

There''s a broad section on charcuterie (sausage and curing) which I''ve not attempted.

Goose is covered, but not as extensively. One is more likely to come across duck than goose, anyway. Photographs are enticing, and recipe directions are clear and thorough. If you are at all interested in cooking duck or goose on a regular or even semi-regular basis, I''d recommend this book. And it would make a great gift for those duck hunters you might know.
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DyreWulf
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent start to finish waterfowl cook book
Reviewed in the United States on December 1, 2013
“Duck, Duck, Goose” really nailed down several points before I even got to the first recipe – Hank Shaw can WRITE, his knowledge of how to find and prepare wild ingredients is exhaustive, and he doesn’t assume you are a trained chef when he puts his thoughts in... See more
“Duck, Duck, Goose” really nailed down several points before I even got to the first recipe – Hank Shaw can WRITE, his knowledge of how to find and prepare wild ingredients is exhaustive, and he doesn’t assume you are a trained chef when he puts his thoughts in writing.

From the very beginning of the book, Mr. Shaw’s enthusiasm for what, in my moderate experience east of the Mississippi, is something of a lost cuisine is an amazing thing to read. Take the very first paragraph of the book as an example:

"Cooking a duck or goose in today’s world is an act of expression. It is a way to find that forgotten feast we Americans once enjoyed, to free ourselves from the Tyranny of the Chicken and shake our fists at the notion that fat is our enemy. Mastering these birds will make you a more competent carnivore. It will help you regain the skills needed to tackle more challenging morsels, such as giblets and wings and rendered fat. Cooking a duck or goose – a whole bird, from bill to feet – is real cooking. True, honest cooking."

I’ve eaten in upstate New York (all of the Southern Tier really) all over Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Jamaica, the United Arab Emirates, and Afghanistan, and while I will admit, VERY few of the restaurants would show up in a foodie’s guidebook, the only, ONLY time’s I’ve EVER seen duck on the menu was in Chinese restaurants and at Number 5′s in Binghamton, New York. The Peking Duck at the Chinese restaurant tasted like it had been dipped in kerosene and left on blacktop for a week, while the wild boar bacon wrapped duck tenderloin appetizer at Number 5′s was phenomenal. So, two experiences, in just shy of 44 years, is not really a wide base from which to compare waterfowl cookery, but I’m damn well going to do it anyway.

Mr. Shaw approaches the topic of how to cook the birds from the very start of the process – what to do after you’ve shot a bird out in the marshes or fields. He addresses hanging the birds versus not hanging the birds, which approach to use in different situations, how each SPECIES of duck or goose might be cared for, and how to use each species, and each part of the bird, for best effect. In fact, because like all hunting, you may NOT get the bird you want, Mr. Shaw even addresses how to use store-bought birds in the same recipes.

That’s one of the wonderful, wonderful things about this book – if you spend the day duck hunting, and end up with four different species, this book will enable you to cook all of them without having to think to yourself “Two pintails, a mallard and a teal, what now?”

Some of the birds discussed in the book are:

Mallard
Teal
Bluebill (Scaup)
Gadwall
Northern Pintail
Northern Shoveler (Spoonie)
Wigeon
Redhead
Canvasback (King Can)
Wood Duck (Woodies)
Ringneck
Surf Scoter
Ruddy
Domestic bird breeds and geese are also covered, and I mean COVERED – in the kitchen, this book will tell you which birds to break down, which ones to keep whole, how to break them down, how to store them, how to render the fat, how to sear, how to make your own duck sausage or salami, everything from confit to jerky.

Mr. Shaw even covers what the various species of birds prefer to eat, and how that affects the flavor considering what part of the migration or mating season they are in, which, for somebody like myself who may now be poking a shotgun barrel into the sky this year, is very important. I now know that if I am cleaning the bird, and I see orange colored fat, to discard the fat and how to use the bird to avoid the fishy flavor of a crustacean eating duck.

Instructions on how to pluck your waterfowl, or if you should skin them, are also included.

This book provides hunters and foodies a glimpse into WHY ducks are so treasured in haute cuisine, including some tidbits of history, such as how Canvasback ducks were priced for the table a hundred years ago (the cost of several days wages for an average person.)

I gathered from this book that duck and goose is making a culinary comeback. If so, I’m looking forward to it, though my treadmill might groan at the extra miles I’ll have to put on it to compensate.

Summary

If you like to hunt and read, this book is a fantastic window into the world of waterfowl. If you like to cook and you don’t hunt, this might get you curious to try hunting, or to branch out into cooking domestic ducks and geese. This is a wonderful, wonderful bridge between what a lot of the public sees as ‘light beer drinking redneckery’ and ‘pass the canapes,’ which the general public incorrectly sees as a form of snobbery. (In fact, take the case of Duck Dynasty and put them in Downton Abbey… because that’s how the general public probably sees hunters in comparison to gourmet food.) Neither stereotype is true – I work with people who are very well educated, have good golf averages, enjoy the arts, and hunt, and anyone who thinks “Downton Abbey” when they think of haute cuisine needs to read Anthony Bourdain’s “Kitchen Confidential” to dispel that thought.

Hank Shaw has effortlessly* bridged that perception gap with a book that could make the most agoraphobic city-dwelling foodie think “Maybe, if I shoot at the sky to get a duck, I won’t notice the lack of buildings wrapped around me…” and at the same time, might make somebody who’s pickup truck doesn’t fit under the average overpass think “Y’know, maybe going into the city for a bite to eat would be worth it!” (Though, honestly, most of the folks I know who hunt would just damn well read the recipes and cook the birds themselves…)
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Anthony Swanson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
My new favorite wild game cookbook
Reviewed in the United States on January 6, 2020
Fantastic, clearly written recipes. Also, for what must be the first time ever among over 15 cookbooks I''ve purchased, I enjoyed the contextual writing as much as the recipes. Really enjoy the author''s engaging and informed - yet unassuming - prose. Look forward... See more
Fantastic, clearly written recipes. Also, for what must be the first time ever among over 15 cookbooks I''ve purchased, I enjoyed the contextual writing as much as the recipes.

Really enjoy the author''s engaging and informed - yet unassuming - prose. Look forward to purchasing more of Mr. Shawn''s books!
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Ranger Rick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Game On! (The Table That Is)
Reviewed in the United States on October 28, 2013
I love to cook. I love to hunt. I have lots of good cookbooks, but none of them is written by an avid hunter/forager like Hank. Guys I hunt with usually fix their game the same way every time, just like grandma did before. Grilled or fried to oblivion, submerged in canned... See more
I love to cook. I love to hunt. I have lots of good cookbooks, but none of them is written by an avid hunter/forager like Hank. Guys I hunt with usually fix their game the same way every time, just like grandma did before. Grilled or fried to oblivion, submerged in canned cream of something soup. Flavor totally gone and texture reminiscent of old chewing gum. Being left to their own devices, it''s no wonder I hear their families comments about not liking ______ (fill in your catch) "because it tastes funny".

No longer. With a copy of this book, anyone with basic skills can prepare waterfowl, either wild or domestic with a little flair. I like the many multi-cultural recipes which takes wild game out of our normal uses. Hank explains each step carefully, so that even if the hunter isn''t the full time chef in the house, they can probably pull a recipe off. He goes a step further than lots of cookbooks with some helpful secondary hints, like rendering goose fat for future use and "How to Clean" tips with pictures. I''ve also scoured his website to learn more about his cooking and plan to buy his other book, "Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast". I bought a second copy for a hunting buddy of mine, just because I was so impressed.

Buy this book, along with "Hunt, Gather, Cook" and you''ve got the perfect Holiday gift set for yourself or the hunter in your house or your hunting buddies!
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Gil R
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Comprehensive book on cooking waterfowl.
Reviewed in the United States on May 26, 2019
Hank Shaw really knows his stuff. I have found this by far to be the best book on cooking waterfowl. And I have tried a few. Recommended for any lover of store bought or wild harvested duck and goose. Would make a great gift for the waterfowler.
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A. Wiederman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mouthwatering presentation of a variety of waterfowl cooking techniques
Reviewed in the United States on October 7, 2013
Hank Shaw has done it again. Actually, he cranked up his game. Whereas his first book, Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast , was more broadly educational and narrative than culinary in scope (don''t get me wrong, the recipes in his... See more
Hank Shaw has done it again. Actually, he cranked up his game.

Whereas his first book, Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast , was more broadly educational and narrative than culinary in scope (don''t get me wrong, the recipes in his first book were noteworthy -- and ones I consult regularly -- but the book dealt largely with the hows and wheres of wild food), his sophomore title transformed his voice into that of a world-class cookbook author.

If you enjoy Hank''s down-to-earth, conversational tone of writing, you may be a bit disappointed. It''s still there, of course, but there are less anecdotes. More attention is paid to the food and techniques themselves. But if you enjoy Hank''s recipes, you will be more than pleased. The same is true if you''re a fan of Holly''s photography; just thumbing through the pages will have your mouth watering by the time you''re done.

This book starts with an overview of the species that''s succinct, yet with careful attention to just the right amount of detail that even an experienced cook or waterfowl hunter will learn something new. He goes through the main breeds (both domestic and wild), includes a step-by-step tutorial (with accompanying pictures) of how to butcher waterfowl, along with practices more specific to wild waterfowl (plucking, hanging, gutting, etc.) The only criticism I have of the introductory material is that it would have been nice to have a representative picture of each duck next to the description of its culinary merit. There''s a handful of pictures, but if you''re curious or have never hunted for waterfowl, you may find yourself Googling a picture of each to refresh your memory.

But when you get to the recipes, you''ll be blown away. Duck and geese really are more versatile than most home cooks realize, a fact that becomes quite evident just a few recipes in, and one that is emphasized as you continue on through.

Hank covers a variety of techniques -- roasting, barbecuing, smoking, sauteeing, braising, charcuterie, etc. -- and a perfect representation of a variety of ethnic recipes. There''s a fair amount of focus on French, German, and Asian recipes, but you''ll also find Greek, Mexican, and even American fare with a waterfowl twist. The recipes range from the simple (Slow-Roasted Duck, which requires just 3 ingredients in addition to a bird) to those for the most ambitious home cook (Italian Duck Cacciatore Salami, which is a stuffed sausage that ferments and then cures.) It includes recipes to make use of giblets (like a tasty-sounding German dish called Ganseklein), duck fat (a duck fat-based hollandaise), and even duck eggs (pasta, cake, etc.)

Although some reviewers have made the criticism that the book is more slanted toward wild waterfowl than domesticated, I don''t think that''s quite true. He gives fair treatment to both. But when you look at the picture on page 63, comparing the breast of a supermarket pekin (which looks like your typical chicken breast) to a wild mallard breast (which looks like a steak), you decide for yourself that wild birds are supreme in terms of flavor. After all, even the best-cooked chicken breast will have nothing on a perfectly-cooked steak.

I will say that I did have a sinking feeling in my gut as I finished the book (and it''s one that you may feel too). I was disappointed. I felt like something was lacking. As I sat trying to figure out exactly what the problem was, it hit me: there aren''t any birds in my freezer! So, although I''m eager to dive headfirst into the many recipes that he shares, for now I have to sit tight until the next time I get a chance to get out on the water and hunt my limit. Not at all a criticism of the book, but be warned: after looking through this book, you might be reaching for your shotgun more than you did last year.
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Top reviews from other countries

jimmy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
good
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 5, 2018
very good
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Mrcharleswdart
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Four Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 19, 2016
A good resource to have.
One person found this helpful
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Nia
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lovely book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 30, 2013
The book is beautifully made and very nicely written. I enjoyed it a lot. Some recipes are a bit complicated but nothing to far away of the possible.
One person found this helpful
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Pat M
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Quack, Quack, Nom.
Reviewed in Canada on March 6, 2019
A must have cookbook for duck lovers. The recipes range from very easy to very difficult, but they are all explained in detail, so no duck is too daunting. There''s a good range of options and a lot of useful information about the different kinds of ducks and the variations...See more
A must have cookbook for duck lovers. The recipes range from very easy to very difficult, but they are all explained in detail, so no duck is too daunting. There''s a good range of options and a lot of useful information about the different kinds of ducks and the variations one should use if cooking wild or domesticated ducks. The book also has a great sense of humour and is nicely put together. Some pretty impressive dishes that with unexpected ingredients but are often easy to throw together.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Anybody that enjoys cooking wild duck and game birds needs ...
Reviewed in Canada on April 19, 2016
Anybody that enjoys cooking wild duck and game birds needs to buy this book. this is the second book I''ve purchased by Hank Shaw, the guy really knows what he is doing, and the recipes are to die for. I can''t wait for his next book, Buck Buck Moose.
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